Evaluate the mission, vision, and values statements of a session-long organization selected by the student.

LED560

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to satisfy the following outcomes:

Module 1

Describe the role of an organization’s leadership in deciding the overall purpose, vision, and mission of an organization, and discuss how the vision and mission statements become the foundation of strategic choice.

Evaluate the mission, vision, and values statements of a session-long organization selected by the student.

Module 2

Evaluate the extent to which monitoring of the external environment assists the organization to best adapt to the threats and opportunities existing within the external environment.

Discuss the ways in which environmental opportunities and threats serve to limit strategic choice.

Module 3

Turn the organization’s vision and mission into action, applying the Grand Strategy Matrix and the BCG Matrix as tools to determine an organization’s “grand strategy.”

Apply the Grand Strategy Matrix to determine the organizational strategy that should be pursued.

Module 4

Assess the extent to which an organization’s culture is supportive of the organization’s strategic direction.

Identify the stated values of an organization, assessing the extent to which the organization’s sense of “morality” (values) aligns with its strategic choices.

COURSE MATERIALS/BIBLIOGRAPHY

Module 1

Required Resources

Bass, B. M. (2007). Executive and strategic leadership. International Journal of Business, 12(1), 33–52. Retrieved from ProQuest.

Blumentritt, T. (2015, April 24). Introduction to strategic management. Youtube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DB90xGiWHIA

Cady, S. H., Wheeler, J. V., DeWolf, J., & Brodke, M. (2011). Mission, vision, and values: What do they say? Organization Development Journal, 29(1), 63–78. Retrieved from ProQuest.

Klag, M., Giroux, H., & Langley, A. (2012). Strategic planning at Saint Francis de Sales Schools. International Journal of Case Studies in Management (Online), 10(2), 1–20. Retrieved from ProQuest.

McNamara, C. (2000). Basics of developing mission, vision, and values statements. Free Management Library. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://managementhelp.org/strategicplanning/mission-vision-values.htm

Olsen, E. (2012, September 5). Overview of the strategic planning process. Virtual Strategist. Podcast retrieved on April 29, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sU3FLxnDv_A

United States Air War College – National Defense University. (n.d.). Strategic vision. Strategic Leadership and Decision Making. Retrieved from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ndu/strat-ldr-dm/pt4ch18.html

Williams, L. S. (2008). The mission statement: A corporate reporting tool with a past, present, and future. Journal of Business Communications, 45(2), 94–119. Retrieved from EBSCO.

Optional Resources

Boal, K. B., & Hoojiberg, R. (2000). Strategic leadership research: Moving on. Leadership Quarterly, 11(4), 515–549. Retrieved from Science Direct.

Crossan, M., Vera, D., & Nanjad, L. Transcendent leadership: Strategic leadership in dynamic environments. Leadership Quarterly, 19 (5), 569–581. Retrieved from EBSCO.

Hitt, M. A., Haynes, K. T., & Serpa, R. (2010). Strategic leadership for the 21st century. Business Horizons, 53, 437–444. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://ssrn.com/abstract=1995786

Ireland, R. D., & Hitt, M. A. (1999). Achieving and maintaining strategic competitiveness in the 21st century: The role of strategic leadership. Academy of Management Executive, 13(1), 43–57.

Rowe, G., & Nejad, M. H. (2009). Strategic leadership: Short-term stability and long-term viability. Ivey Business Journal Online. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from

http://www.iveybusinessjournal.com/topics/leadership/strategic-leadership-short-term-stability-and-long-term-viability

Strategic Leadership: Embracing Change (2012, March 23). Cal Miramar University. Podcast retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPIqJbLjNbM

Wilson, I. (1996). The 5 compasses of strategic leadership. Strategy and Leadership, 24(4), 26–31. Retrieved from ProQuest.

Module 1 – Home

THE STRATEGIC COMPASS

Modular Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this module, the student will be able to satisfy the following outcomes:

Case

Describe the process by which an organization’s leadership decides upon the overall purpose, vision, and mission of an organization, and give examples as to how the vision and mission statements become the foundation of overall strategic choice.

SLP

Evaluate the mission and vision statements of a selected organization.

Discussion

Discuss and analyze the ways in which “Strategic Leadership” differs from “Strategic Management.”

Module Overview

According to Ireland and Hitt: “Strategic Leadership is defined as a person’s ability to anticipate, envision, maintain flexibility, think strategically, and work with others to initiate changes that will create a viable future for the organization” (p. 43). *** Not only is a leader’s ability to think strategically important to an organization’s viability, but strategic thinking is also critical to an organization’s success. In this context, Ireland and Hitt suggest that there are several key components of the Strategic Leadership framework. These include such key activities as determining an organization’s purpose, exploiting and maintaining core competencies, ensuring the effectiveness of the organization’s culture, and emphasizing ethical practices while the organization pursues its stated purpose.

*** Source: Ireland, R. D., & Hitt, M. A. (1999). Achieving and maintaining strategic competitiveness in the 21st century: The role of strategic leadership. Academy of Management Executive, 13(1), 43-57.

Module 1 – Background

THE STRATEGIC COMPASS

Part 1: The Nature of Strategic Leadership (as distinct from Strategic Management)

There is a very clear distinction between Strategic Management and Strategic Leadership, both in terms of scope and in terms of who is responsible. The Strategic Management process is concerned not only with establishing the purpose of the organization and with strategic choice (as is true of Strategic Leadership), but also with the management of a strategy or strategies. The management of organizational strategy is accomplished through a variety of implementation control systems, including policies and procedures, rules, budgets, and organizational structure. Note that in the Strategic Management process, both leadership and management have roles to play at various stages of the overall process. In contrast, the Strategic Leadership process is concerned solely with the scope of authority, responsibilities, and activities of an organization’s top leadership as they relate to strategy. In this context, therefore, we will concern ourselves with those activities that are specifically within the purview, authority, and responsibility of the organization’s top leadership.

This is by no means to suggest that top leadership is not concerned with implementation and control systems that must be put in place in order to ensure the success of a chosen strategic direction. Top leadership is inherently interested in (and is quite highly concerned with) the proper implementation and monitoring of strategy. The focus of this course will be on those activities that primarily concern top leadership, to include the following: Establishing the organization’s purpose by means of vision, mission, and values statements made explicit; establishing the system of values within which everyone in the organization must operate; formulating an organizational culture that best fits strategic choice; and selecting a grand strategy (or set of strategies) that fit the organization best – and that should consequently be pursued over the longer term.

Required Resources

Begin by viewing the following video. Note that choosing the right strategy (a top leadership activity) and implementing that strategy (which is very clearly a management function) are both critical to strategic success. The organization must get both of these activities right: Implementing a bad – or ill-fitting – strategy makes no sense; nor does it make sense to choose the perfect strategy, only to execute that strategy poorly and have it fail:

Blumentritt, T. (2015, April 24). Introduction to strategic management. Youtube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DB90xGiWHIA

The following short video is also a worthwhile introduction to the strategic planning/strategic management process (these terms are often used interchangeably). As you watch this short video, consider which activities/steps are management-oriented (e.g., setting of short-term goals, implementation), and contrast those that are the central responsibilities of leadership (setting the organizational vision, for example):

Olsen, E. (2012, September 5). Overview of the strategic planning process. Virtual Strategist. Podcast retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sU3FLxnDv_A

Part 2: The Nature of Strategic Leadership and Strategic Thinking

While it may seem obvious, it should also be made explicit: The hallmark characteristic of great strategic leaders is that they are skilled strategic thinkers. Begin this section by reading the following article, in which the role of top leadership in the determination of strategy is discussed, and the concept of “Strategic Leadership” is defined and contextualized:

Bass, B. M. (2007). Executive and strategic leadership. International Journal of Business, 12(1), 33-52. Retrieved from ProQuest on October 26, 2013.

Authored by the United States War College, the following online book is a very useful resource as it relates to Strategic Leadership. Briefly review the contents of Chapter 9: Strategic Thinking:

United States Air War College – National Defense University. (n.d.) Strategic leadership and decision making. Retrieved on November 19, 2013, from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ndu/strat-ldr-dm/cont.html

Part 3: Establishing the Organization’s Direction: Vision and Mission

Having defined Strategic Leadership and Strategic Thinking, turn to the first step that top leadership must play in strategy: defining the purpose of the organization. Top leadership does this through the vision and mission. The vision is futuristic, communicating what the organization aspires to become. In contrast to the vision statement, the mission statement conveys the present state of the organization. It explains the reasons that the organization exists, and makes explicit what the organization does (e.g., describing what it sells, defining its customers).

The following journal article is an excellent discussion of the vision and mission:

Cady, S. H., Wheeler, J. V., DeWolf, J., & Brodke, M. (2011). Mission, vision, and values: What do they say? Organization Development Journal, 29(1), 63-78. Retrieved from ProQuest.

United States Air War College – National Defense University. (n.d.). Strategic vision. Strategic Leadership and Decision Making. Retrieved from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ndu/strat-ldr-dm/pt4ch18.html

The Free Management Library is an excellent introductory resource for most business-related topics. Read the basics of developing meaningful vision and mission statements:

McNamara, C. (2000). Basics of developing mission, vision, and values statements. Free Management Library. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://managementhelp.org/strategicplanning/mission-vision-values.htm

Finally, Williams’ article offers an excellent and quite thorough overview of mission statements, their scope, and suggested content:

Williams, L. S. (2008). The mission statement: A corporate reporting tool with a past, present, and future. Journal of Business Communications, 45(2), 94-119. Retrieved from EBSCO.

Optional Resources

The following Strategy and Leadership article serves as the foundation for this course. While the journal article is dated, its theoretical contribution for today’s organizations remains clear:

Wilson, I. (1996). The 5 compasses of strategic leadership. Strategy and Leadership, 24(4), 26-31. Retrieved from ProQuest.

The Ivey Business Journal Online, authored by Rowe and Nejad, is an excellent source of content related to leadership and strategy. The article defines what is meant by “Strategic Leadership,” as well as the central characteristics and qualities of strategic leaders:

Rowe, G., & Nejad, M. H. (2009). Strategic leadership: Short-term stability and long-term viability. Ivey Business Journal Online. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://iveybusinessjournal.com/topics/leadership/strategic-leadership-short-term- stability-and-long-term-viability

Change is a constant. In this short video, Strategic Leadership is framed within the notion of discontinuity:

Strategic Leadership: Embracing Change (2012, March 23). Cal Miramar University. Podcast retrieved on April 29, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPIqJbLjNbM

For a current (21st century) perspective on strategic leadership, download this superb article, written by Hitt et al:

Hitt, M. A., Haynes, K.T., & Serpa, R. (2010). Strategic leadership for the 21st century. Business Horizons, 53, 437-444. Retrieved on April 29, 2014, from: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1995786

Finally, the following articles provide excellent overviews of Strategic Leadership theory and research in general. Crossan et al. discuss the means by which strategic leaders work within today’s dynamic and ever-changing environments. Note the authors’ emphasis on the changes that have occurred within organizations (change is not solely external to the organization), in addition to the authors’ position as to how transcendental leadership relates to the notion of strategic leadership:

Boal, K. B., & Hoojiberg, R. (2000). Strategic leadership research: Moving on. Leadership Quarterly, 11(4), 515-549. Retrieved from Science Direct.

Crossan, M., Vera, D., & Nanjad, L. Transcendent leadership: Strategic leadership in dynamic environments. Leadership Quarterly, 19 (5), 569-581. Retrieved from EBSCO.

Module 1 – Case Assignment

THE STRATEGIC COMPASS

Assignment Overview

Develop the vision and mission statements for an organization. Measure these statements against the criteria for meaningful vision and mission statements, providing comprehensive support and justification. The Case must be completed before the SLP.

First, read the following article:

Klag, M., Giroux, H., & Langley, A. (2012). Strategic planning at Saint Francis de Sales Schools. International Journal of Case Studies in Management (Online), 10(2), 1-20. Retrieved from ProQuest.

Case Assignment

Using the article above and the readings provided on the Background page of Module 1, write a 6- to 7-page paper in which you do the following:

Using the criteria for development of quality, meaningful vision and mission statements, create the vision and mission statements for the Saint Francis de Sales Schools, providing comprehensive support for the statements you have developed.

Keys to the Assignment

The key aspects of this assignment that are to be covered in your paper include the following:

State the criteria that you believe are essential to meaningful, quality vision and mission statements. Provide a minimum of five criteria for each of the two statements (vision and mission). Briefly justify each criterion (1-2 sentences for each).

Using the criteria you have selected above, develop the vision and mission statements for the Saint Francis de Sales Schools.

Next, using the criteria you have selected, justify the mission and vision statements you have developed.

Give clear and convincing rationale for why – in light of events and circumstances discussed in the article – you believe that John Handover should adopt your version of the school’s vision and mission statements.

Be sure to use a minimum of three library sources in support of your answers!

Module 1 – SLP Assignment

THE STRATEGIC COMPASS

Overview of the LED560 SLP Sequence

The SLP sequence for this course requires that you choose an organization, and that you apply the Five Compass Model of Strategic Leadership to that organization. For background on the 5 Compass Model, see:

Wilson, I. (1996). The 5 compasses of strategic leadership. Strategy and Leadership, 24(4), 26-31. Retrieved from ProQuest.

Assignment

Write a 3- to 4-page paper in which you address the following:

After selecting a for-profit or not-for-profit organization that is of interest to you, analyze the organization’s vision and mission statements against the criteria for meaningful statements, revising the statements as required.

Keys to the Assignment

The key aspects of this assignment that should be covered in your paper include the following:

Using the library or the Internet, choose an organization that is of interest to you. For this purpose, you are required to choose an organization in which you are not currently employed. (Hint: You may want to choose your target organization using a current listing of Fortune 500 companies.)

Locate the organization’s website. Spend time navigating the company website, so that you have a good understanding of what the company does.

Provide the name and website address of your chosen organization.

Locate and write down the organization’s mission and vision statements.

Critique each of the foregoing statements against the criteria included in the Background readings and/or the criteria you developed for the Case assignment. Note: Organizations have a tendency to combine their mission and vision statements; therefore, you may need to decide whether a given statement is a mission statement or a vision statement. Be sure to back up your critiques with research that appropriately supports your analysis.

Rewrite the vision and mission statements in the proper format for vision and mission statements.

In the context of the criteria for “good” vision and mission statements, defend the adjustments/changes you have made to the statements.

SLP Assignment Expectations

At Trident University, your assignments are evaluated using grading rubrics. While every assignment is assessed using one of the rubrics, grading rubrics may differ across assignments. Should you need help locating the grading rubric for this SLP, be sure to watch the following video: http://permalink.fliqz.com/aspx/permalink.aspx?at=b13c1b2c864344a

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