Literature Review; Data Collection – To access articles in the Library for this class and others, please refer to the instructions on the Syllabus Custom Essay

Literature Review; Data Collection – To access articles in the Library for this class and others, please refer to the instructions on the Syllabus Custom Essay

To access articles in the Library for this class and others, please refer to the instructions on the Syllabus and in Case 1.

For this assignment, you will use one of the scholarly research articles you chose for the SLP in this module.

Look at the subheadings below and make sure you choose an article that will have enough information to complete the assignment. You will not earn points by stating that the article did not include all of the information required to answer each part of the assignment.

It is your responsibility to find an article that does contain the information.

Note: This assignment asks for more information than you provided in the previous module, so please be sure to read the instructions.

Before you begin writing, review the subheadings again and make sure the article you chose has all of the information needed to

complete the assignment. If it does not, you should search again for a suitable article. If you are unsure of how to proceed, please

ask for clarification before you start your paper.

Write a 2-page summary of the article, using the exact same subheadings listed below, in the exact same order, and following the

instructions below. You only have to write a couple of sentences under each subheading.

Your summary must be written in your own words. I already know that the authors of the article can identify their purpose, hypothesis,

etc. so copying the information from the article will not show me what you understand. Do not copy/paste or simply paraphrase. Explain

each section to me so I can see what you learned from reading the article.

The purpose of this assignment is to show that you can identify these sections of a research article. This is an exercise in critical

thinking — it is never ok to simply copy or paraphrase the article’s abstract.

Introduction: Write a couple of sentences to introduce the topic you chose.

Reference: This should be so accurate that the reader can go directly from the abstract to the original article. Give a complete APA

style reference.

Kind of research: Identify the kind of research, i.e., experimental, quasi-experimental, observational (descriptive, case study,

historical, etc.). Although the article may not be a clear example of one of these, it can usually be classified under one of these.

Purpose: Sometimes the purpose is stated as an aim, an objective, or a goal. At other times, it is incorporated in a statement of a

problem, leaving the reader to infer the purpose has a stated problem, a purpose, or both. In case the purpose is inferred, you may

state it in your own words.

Design: If the article is an experimental or quasi-experimental research, it is usually possible to identify the design of the study.

Descriptive and historical research articles may or may not have a design that can be categorized. Try to identify the design for each

article. Comment if you are unable to determine the design, and explain why.

Participants: The term “participant” refers to the sample studied. Under this heading you should include a description of ages, sexes,

socio-economic status, school grade, mental level, number, and/or any other demographic characteristics given in the article to

describe the particular sample used in the study.

Procedure: Sometimes the procedure is referred to as the “method” and includes a description of control techniques, measuring devices,

materials used and ways of proceeding, in attempting to achieve the purpose or purposes of the study. Are measures of validity and

reliability reported by the author? If so, what measures were used? When such are not reported it should be so stated.

Variables: Identify the variables in the study. Identify the independent and dependent variables. The independent variables are usually

the cause, stimulus, antecedent treatment or the identified groups (males-females; young couples, middle aged couples, mature couples;

Baptist, Catholics, Methodists, Mormans; upper class, middle class, lower class; etc.) whereas the dependent variable is usually the

effect, response, or consequence.

Level of Measurement (data): Although this is often unclear, you should try to identify the level of measurement such as nominal,


 

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