What does Cone mean by this?

2. The second part of this semester has focused on how we might become “men and women for others.” Part of this process is looking honestly at the injustices and forms of oppression that exist in our world, and beginning to grapple with how we might rectify them. Bearing this in mind, discuss TWO of the following in an essay:
a. In her essay, “The God Who Breaks Chains,” Elizabeth Johnson discusses the Black liberation theology of James Cone, amongst others. Cone affirms that, in a racist society, “God is Black.” What does Cone mean by this? If it’s not meant to say that God is literally black (as opposed to white, Asian, lighter skinned, etc.), what is this statement meant to do? What kind of response does this require from black people? What response is it meant to elicit in white people?
b. Dr. King believed that non-violent resistance was an essential part of working for concrete social change. Using the situation in Birmingham at his time as an example, discuss the four parts of non-violent action that he lays out in the “Letter from the Birmingham Jail.” Why is the order of them important? Why is it essential that direct action trigger a response that can be publicized?
c. Elizabeth Johnson writes that some feminists see Jesus’ maleness as legitimizing patriarchy and androcentrism. What do these terms mean? Why do some see Jesus’ sex as doing this? What are two arguments or examples Johnson gives to argue that Jesus is actually liberating for women?
 

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