Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the.

Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the writer made you want to learn more? Why or why not?Body:
Underline the topic sentences on the paper. Is there a clear connection between each of the paragraphs and the thesis? If not, where do you see problems?Are points substantiated with evidence? Is the evidence pertinent, reliable, and/or verifiable?Are paragraphs unified (exploring only one idea)? Point out paragraphs that lack unity.Are paragraphs developed (is there enough information in each paragraph)? Point out paragraphs that lack development.Are there in-text citations in MLA style if sources are used?Conclusion:
Is the thesis restated (and, if possible, reworded)? Is the length of the conclusion appropriate? Does it need to be tightened or expanded? Why?What strategies does the paper use to close the discussion (ex: brief summary of points, recommendation)?Are you interested in learning more about (has the author made the topic relevant to you)? Why or why not?Overall Recommendations:
Are there issues related to grammar and punctuation that the author needs to address? If so, what are they?Have sources been quoted correctly, if sources were used?Is the Works Cited formatted correctly, if sources were used?List three strengths (what you feel the author did well) and three weakness (areas that need improvement) of the paper.
PAPER 1
A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have. Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7780.
Batsching, Sophie, et al. Inescapable Stress Changes Walking Behavior in Flies – Learned
Helplessness Revisited. Scholarly Journals, vol. 11, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 116.
PAPER 2 Short Story Essay In the short story Gryphon by Charles Baxter, the author writes a short story from the perspective of a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School in Five Oaks, Michigan. Throughout the course of this story the narrator, who is a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School, talks about the experience of a normal day in his classroom and the interactions that he has with other students and his teacher as well. The story begins in the narrators classroom, and its where the majority of the story takes place. During a normal day of class, the narrators teacher, whose name is Mr. Hibler, begins to feel ill, and starts to cough. This prompts a substitute to be called in to instruct the narrators class in his absence the next day. The setting in the town where the school is located contributes to many of the things that happen in the story, including one of the most notable and important factors of the story, which is the appearance of a substitute teacher called in to teach the narrators class. The substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the entire class, and she leaves a strange initial impression on the class of fourth graders with her eccentric clothing and overall character. Ms. Ferenczi is a woman whose parents are Hungarian and French, and she came to the U.S. because of unknown circumstances. The main characters that are introduced in the beginning of the story play crucial roles to the development of the plot to the story, as well as the progression of the ideas of other characters in regards to how they view the strange new substitute that is taking the place of their normal teacher.
Throughout the length of Gryphon, the story is told through the viewpoint of a fourth-grade student at an elementary school in Michigan, where he is in the process of learning more about Egyptian culture and technology. During one class, his teacher becomes sick with a cold, and he is forced to take a few days off, giving way to a substitute; someone who is difficult to come across in the small community that the narrator lives. The next day, a new strange substitute arrives as cover for the narrators sick teacher. The plot of the story is advanced with every day the substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, spent teaching the students in the narrators class. Ms. Ferenczi would tell the children stories such as why the Egyptians built the pyramids, and also about how death isnt the end of life and everything itself, but the beginning of another existence for human existence. The narrator in this portion of the story is an observer that offers his thoughts on the things that the strange Ms. Ferenczi would say in class. For the most part, the narrator believes that many of the things that Ms. Ferenczi says are not true, and makes a point of this by jokingly convincing one of his classmates on the bus ride home that a lot of the things Ms. Ferenczi says are true. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the other students that are in the narrators class tell their teacher Mr. Hibler about all of the things that Ms. Ferenczi told them about during his absence, but he is indifferent, as most of the work that the students had to complete had been finished. Later on, Ms. Ferenczi returns as a substitute for Mr. Hiblers class, and she is as odd and eccentric as she was before. On this occasion, however, she has a surprise for the students of Mr. Hiblers class, and it is in the form of her telling each of the children their fortunes for the future. Each of the students in the class line up to have Ms. Ferenczi tell their fortune, and some of them are either pleased or frightened by what they are told. In particular, one of the children was told by the substitute that they would soon die, and this made him upset enough to report her to the principal, effectively getting rid of Ms. Ferenczi as their teacher. This demonstrates that the main basis for the plot in the story was a new substitute covering for the narrators sick teacher for a couple of days, and eventually figuring out that the substitute was a very strange women that would have to leave as a result of this.
In the story Gryphon, each one of the main characters in the progress themselves based upon their actions. The narrator is introduced at the start of the story as a normal fourth-grade boy that is simply going through another ordinary day of school. These general characteristics are maintained through the entire story, but eventually, the narrator starts to change how he views things around him and starts to question things that he views as normal occurrences. These changes are in response to others around him, and the largest influencer of these changes is the new substitute that covers the narrators normal teacher, Mr. Hibler. The new substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the class of fourth-graders that the narrator is in. Ms. Ferenczi is dress in clothes with vibrant colors and she wears gaudy, gold rimmed glasses. She is an older woman that has some lines running down her face that the narrator says are similar to Pinocchio. During the beginning of the story, the narrator says that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent and behaves in a flamboyant manner. The reason that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent is because her parents were from Hungary and France, and they came to the U.S. for unknown reasons, according to her. Through the rest of the story, Ms. Ferenczi teaches the students based off of the lesson plan that Mr. Hibler had left for the substitute that covered for him. Despite this, Ms. Ferenczi begins to drift away from the lesson plan, and tells the students stories about things that are slightly related to what they were discussing in class. Ms. Ferenczi told the children about Egyptian myths and she even claimed that she had seen even seen a mythical creature called a Gryphon, which is a hybrid between an eagle and a lion. This caught the interest of all the students in the classroom, including the narrator of the story. They all wondered about all the marvelous stories that Ms. Ferenczi had told them during the time that she was there substitute. The narrator also questioned how legitimate all of the claims that his substitute had made, showing that he had become inquisitive during the time that Ms. Ferenczi had been his substitute. He also knew that some of the things that she had said had a grain of truth to them such as the story about flesh eating plants, which he had seen in a television show about nature. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the narrator wonders whether any of the things that she ever said were actually true. This continues up until the strange substitute actually returns to their class, and leaves after she predicted that one of the students would soon meet his end. The events at the end of this story demonstrate the character of both the narrator and of the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi.
The setting in the story Gryphon takes place entirely in a fictional small town called Five Oaks in Michigan. The narrator explains that the town is small enough that nearly everyone in the town knows each other, and that newcomers usually stand out amongst everyone else. This is why when the narrators teacher comes down with a cold, he also mentions that a substitute is hard to come by on such short notice in a small town. A substitute is found for the next day of class, and it is a new female substitute. The students recognize that she is new to town, despite only being in the fourth grade. The substitute explains that she is new in town as well, and that she is of Hungarian and French descent. The impact that the setting has upon the narrator and everyone else in the classroom is that since they live in rural place with a small population, residents that are new are usually very few and far between. This demonstrates that the diversity that is present throughout the entire United States reaches every corner of the country and in every state, county, and city. The effect that this has is shown with the presence of the substitute in the town of Five Oaks.
In conclusion, throughout the short story Gryphon, the main characters progress the ideas and thoughts of other characters that are developed in regards to the substitute, who is also one of the main characters in the story. The plot of the story mainly circles around the narrator that describes the strange substitute, Ms. Ferenczi, being his teacher for several days, and eventually leaving and not coming back after she tells a student that his death was in the immediate future. The characters in the story, which consists of two main characters, which are the narrator and the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi. Both the narrator and the substitute develop over the course of the story in regards to their personalities, interactions with others, and other personal traits as well. The setting throughout the story remains consistently in the same town of Five Oaks in Michigan. Despites this, the setting has a noticeable impact on the emotions that the narrator, students, and other teachers in the story because of the substitutes background, which is something that is unusual and uncommon to the people of the small town. The reason being that everyone in the town knows each other, and having a new resident that is as strange as Ms. Ferenczi is odd even for the children in the fourth-grade class that she is substituting for. These are some of the characteristics from the short story Gryphon in regards to characters, plot, and setting.
PAPER 3 A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have.
Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7

 

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Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the.

Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the writer made you want to learn more? Why or why not?Body:
Underline the topic sentences on the paper. Is there a clear connection between each of the paragraphs and the thesis? If not, where do you see problems?Are points substantiated with evidence? Is the evidence pertinent, reliable, and/or verifiable?Are paragraphs unified (exploring only one idea)? Point out paragraphs that lack unity.Are paragraphs developed (is there enough information in each paragraph)? Point out paragraphs that lack development.Are there in-text citations in MLA style if sources are used?Conclusion:
Is the thesis restated (and, if possible, reworded)? Is the length of the conclusion appropriate? Does it need to be tightened or expanded? Why?What strategies does the paper use to close the discussion (ex: brief summary of points, recommendation)?Are you interested in learning more about (has the author made the topic relevant to you)? Why or why not?Overall Recommendations:
Are there issues related to grammar and punctuation that the author needs to address? If so, what are they?Have sources been quoted correctly, if sources were used?Is the Works Cited formatted correctly, if sources were used?List three strengths (what you feel the author did well) and three weakness (areas that need improvement) of the paper.
PAPER 1
A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have. Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7780.
Batsching, Sophie, et al. Inescapable Stress Changes Walking Behavior in Flies – Learned
Helplessness Revisited. Scholarly Journals, vol. 11, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 116.
PAPER 2 Short Story Essay In the short story Gryphon by Charles Baxter, the author writes a short story from the perspective of a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School in Five Oaks, Michigan. Throughout the course of this story the narrator, who is a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School, talks about the experience of a normal day in his classroom and the interactions that he has with other students and his teacher as well. The story begins in the narrators classroom, and its where the majority of the story takes place. During a normal day of class, the narrators teacher, whose name is Mr. Hibler, begins to feel ill, and starts to cough. This prompts a substitute to be called in to instruct the narrators class in his absence the next day. The setting in the town where the school is located contributes to many of the things that happen in the story, including one of the most notable and important factors of the story, which is the appearance of a substitute teacher called in to teach the narrators class. The substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the entire class, and she leaves a strange initial impression on the class of fourth graders with her eccentric clothing and overall character. Ms. Ferenczi is a woman whose parents are Hungarian and French, and she came to the U.S. because of unknown circumstances. The main characters that are introduced in the beginning of the story play crucial roles to the development of the plot to the story, as well as the progression of the ideas of other characters in regards to how they view the strange new substitute that is taking the place of their normal teacher.
Throughout the length of Gryphon, the story is told through the viewpoint of a fourth-grade student at an elementary school in Michigan, where he is in the process of learning more about Egyptian culture and technology. During one class, his teacher becomes sick with a cold, and he is forced to take a few days off, giving way to a substitute; someone who is difficult to come across in the small community that the narrator lives. The next day, a new strange substitute arrives as cover for the narrators sick teacher. The plot of the story is advanced with every day the substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, spent teaching the students in the narrators class. Ms. Ferenczi would tell the children stories such as why the Egyptians built the pyramids, and also about how death isnt the end of life and everything itself, but the beginning of another existence for human existence. The narrator in this portion of the story is an observer that offers his thoughts on the things that the strange Ms. Ferenczi would say in class. For the most part, the narrator believes that many of the things that Ms. Ferenczi says are not true, and makes a point of this by jokingly convincing one of his classmates on the bus ride home that a lot of the things Ms. Ferenczi says are true. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the other students that are in the narrators class tell their teacher Mr. Hibler about all of the things that Ms. Ferenczi told them about during his absence, but he is indifferent, as most of the work that the students had to complete had been finished. Later on, Ms. Ferenczi returns as a substitute for Mr. Hiblers class, and she is as odd and eccentric as she was before. On this occasion, however, she has a surprise for the students of Mr. Hiblers class, and it is in the form of her telling each of the children their fortunes for the future. Each of the students in the class line up to have Ms. Ferenczi tell their fortune, and some of them are either pleased or frightened by what they are told. In particular, one of the children was told by the substitute that they would soon die, and this made him upset enough to report her to the principal, effectively getting rid of Ms. Ferenczi as their teacher. This demonstrates that the main basis for the plot in the story was a new substitute covering for the narrators sick teacher for a couple of days, and eventually figuring out that the substitute was a very strange women that would have to leave as a result of this.
In the story Gryphon, each one of the main characters in the progress themselves based upon their actions. The narrator is introduced at the start of the story as a normal fourth-grade boy that is simply going through another ordinary day of school. These general characteristics are maintained through the entire story, but eventually, the narrator starts to change how he views things around him and starts to question things that he views as normal occurrences. These changes are in response to others around him, and the largest influencer of these changes is the new substitute that covers the narrators normal teacher, Mr. Hibler. The new substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the class of fourth-graders that the narrator is in. Ms. Ferenczi is dress in clothes with vibrant colors and she wears gaudy, gold rimmed glasses. She is an older woman that has some lines running down her face that the narrator says are similar to Pinocchio. During the beginning of the story, the narrator says that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent and behaves in a flamboyant manner. The reason that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent is because her parents were from Hungary and France, and they came to the U.S. for unknown reasons, according to her. Through the rest of the story, Ms. Ferenczi teaches the students based off of the lesson plan that Mr. Hibler had left for the substitute that covered for him. Despite this, Ms. Ferenczi begins to drift away from the lesson plan, and tells the students stories about things that are slightly related to what they were discussing in class. Ms. Ferenczi told the children about Egyptian myths and she even claimed that she had seen even seen a mythical creature called a Gryphon, which is a hybrid between an eagle and a lion. This caught the interest of all the students in the classroom, including the narrator of the story. They all wondered about all the marvelous stories that Ms. Ferenczi had told them during the time that she was there substitute. The narrator also questioned how legitimate all of the claims that his substitute had made, showing that he had become inquisitive during the time that Ms. Ferenczi had been his substitute. He also knew that some of the things that she had said had a grain of truth to them such as the story about flesh eating plants, which he had seen in a television show about nature. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the narrator wonders whether any of the things that she ever said were actually true. This continues up until the strange substitute actually returns to their class, and leaves after she predicted that one of the students would soon meet his end. The events at the end of this story demonstrate the character of both the narrator and of the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi.
The setting in the story Gryphon takes place entirely in a fictional small town called Five Oaks in Michigan. The narrator explains that the town is small enough that nearly everyone in the town knows each other, and that newcomers usually stand out amongst everyone else. This is why when the narrators teacher comes down with a cold, he also mentions that a substitute is hard to come by on such short notice in a small town. A substitute is found for the next day of class, and it is a new female substitute. The students recognize that she is new to town, despite only being in the fourth grade. The substitute explains that she is new in town as well, and that she is of Hungarian and French descent. The impact that the setting has upon the narrator and everyone else in the classroom is that since they live in rural place with a small population, residents that are new are usually very few and far between. This demonstrates that the diversity that is present throughout the entire United States reaches every corner of the country and in every state, county, and city. The effect that this has is shown with the presence of the substitute in the town of Five Oaks.
In conclusion, throughout the short story Gryphon, the main characters progress the ideas and thoughts of other characters that are developed in regards to the substitute, who is also one of the main characters in the story. The plot of the story mainly circles around the narrator that describes the strange substitute, Ms. Ferenczi, being his teacher for several days, and eventually leaving and not coming back after she tells a student that his death was in the immediate future. The characters in the story, which consists of two main characters, which are the narrator and the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi. Both the narrator and the substitute develop over the course of the story in regards to their personalities, interactions with others, and other personal traits as well. The setting throughout the story remains consistently in the same town of Five Oaks in Michigan. Despites this, the setting has a noticeable impact on the emotions that the narrator, students, and other teachers in the story because of the substitutes background, which is something that is unusual and uncommon to the people of the small town. The reason being that everyone in the town knows each other, and having a new resident that is as strange as Ms. Ferenczi is odd even for the children in the fourth-grade class that she is substituting for. These are some of the characteristics from the short story Gryphon in regards to characters, plot, and setting.
PAPER 3 A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have.
Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7

 

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Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the.

Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the writer made you want to learn more? Why or why not?Body:
Underline the topic sentences on the paper. Is there a clear connection between each of the paragraphs and the thesis? If not, where do you see problems?Are points substantiated with evidence? Is the evidence pertinent, reliable, and/or verifiable?Are paragraphs unified (exploring only one idea)? Point out paragraphs that lack unity.Are paragraphs developed (is there enough information in each paragraph)? Point out paragraphs that lack development.Are there in-text citations in MLA style if sources are used?Conclusion:
Is the thesis restated (and, if possible, reworded)? Is the length of the conclusion appropriate? Does it need to be tightened or expanded? Why?What strategies does the paper use to close the discussion (ex: brief summary of points, recommendation)?Are you interested in learning more about (has the author made the topic relevant to you)? Why or why not?Overall Recommendations:
Are there issues related to grammar and punctuation that the author needs to address? If so, what are they?Have sources been quoted correctly, if sources were used?Is the Works Cited formatted correctly, if sources were used?List three strengths (what you feel the author did well) and three weakness (areas that need improvement) of the paper.
PAPER 1
A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have. Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7780.
Batsching, Sophie, et al. Inescapable Stress Changes Walking Behavior in Flies – Learned
Helplessness Revisited. Scholarly Journals, vol. 11, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 116.
PAPER 2 Short Story Essay In the short story Gryphon by Charles Baxter, the author writes a short story from the perspective of a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School in Five Oaks, Michigan. Throughout the course of this story the narrator, who is a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School, talks about the experience of a normal day in his classroom and the interactions that he has with other students and his teacher as well. The story begins in the narrators classroom, and its where the majority of the story takes place. During a normal day of class, the narrators teacher, whose name is Mr. Hibler, begins to feel ill, and starts to cough. This prompts a substitute to be called in to instruct the narrators class in his absence the next day. The setting in the town where the school is located contributes to many of the things that happen in the story, including one of the most notable and important factors of the story, which is the appearance of a substitute teacher called in to teach the narrators class. The substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the entire class, and she leaves a strange initial impression on the class of fourth graders with her eccentric clothing and overall character. Ms. Ferenczi is a woman whose parents are Hungarian and French, and she came to the U.S. because of unknown circumstances. The main characters that are introduced in the beginning of the story play crucial roles to the development of the plot to the story, as well as the progression of the ideas of other characters in regards to how they view the strange new substitute that is taking the place of their normal teacher.
Throughout the length of Gryphon, the story is told through the viewpoint of a fourth-grade student at an elementary school in Michigan, where he is in the process of learning more about Egyptian culture and technology. During one class, his teacher becomes sick with a cold, and he is forced to take a few days off, giving way to a substitute; someone who is difficult to come across in the small community that the narrator lives. The next day, a new strange substitute arrives as cover for the narrators sick teacher. The plot of the story is advanced with every day the substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, spent teaching the students in the narrators class. Ms. Ferenczi would tell the children stories such as why the Egyptians built the pyramids, and also about how death isnt the end of life and everything itself, but the beginning of another existence for human existence. The narrator in this portion of the story is an observer that offers his thoughts on the things that the strange Ms. Ferenczi would say in class. For the most part, the narrator believes that many of the things that Ms. Ferenczi says are not true, and makes a point of this by jokingly convincing one of his classmates on the bus ride home that a lot of the things Ms. Ferenczi says are true. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the other students that are in the narrators class tell their teacher Mr. Hibler about all of the things that Ms. Ferenczi told them about during his absence, but he is indifferent, as most of the work that the students had to complete had been finished. Later on, Ms. Ferenczi returns as a substitute for Mr. Hiblers class, and she is as odd and eccentric as she was before. On this occasion, however, she has a surprise for the students of Mr. Hiblers class, and it is in the form of her telling each of the children their fortunes for the future. Each of the students in the class line up to have Ms. Ferenczi tell their fortune, and some of them are either pleased or frightened by what they are told. In particular, one of the children was told by the substitute that they would soon die, and this made him upset enough to report her to the principal, effectively getting rid of Ms. Ferenczi as their teacher. This demonstrates that the main basis for the plot in the story was a new substitute covering for the narrators sick teacher for a couple of days, and eventually figuring out that the substitute was a very strange women that would have to leave as a result of this.
In the story Gryphon, each one of the main characters in the progress themselves based upon their actions. The narrator is introduced at the start of the story as a normal fourth-grade boy that is simply going through another ordinary day of school. These general characteristics are maintained through the entire story, but eventually, the narrator starts to change how he views things around him and starts to question things that he views as normal occurrences. These changes are in response to others around him, and the largest influencer of these changes is the new substitute that covers the narrators normal teacher, Mr. Hibler. The new substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the class of fourth-graders that the narrator is in. Ms. Ferenczi is dress in clothes with vibrant colors and she wears gaudy, gold rimmed glasses. She is an older woman that has some lines running down her face that the narrator says are similar to Pinocchio. During the beginning of the story, the narrator says that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent and behaves in a flamboyant manner. The reason that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent is because her parents were from Hungary and France, and they came to the U.S. for unknown reasons, according to her. Through the rest of the story, Ms. Ferenczi teaches the students based off of the lesson plan that Mr. Hibler had left for the substitute that covered for him. Despite this, Ms. Ferenczi begins to drift away from the lesson plan, and tells the students stories about things that are slightly related to what they were discussing in class. Ms. Ferenczi told the children about Egyptian myths and she even claimed that she had seen even seen a mythical creature called a Gryphon, which is a hybrid between an eagle and a lion. This caught the interest of all the students in the classroom, including the narrator of the story. They all wondered about all the marvelous stories that Ms. Ferenczi had told them during the time that she was there substitute. The narrator also questioned how legitimate all of the claims that his substitute had made, showing that he had become inquisitive during the time that Ms. Ferenczi had been his substitute. He also knew that some of the things that she had said had a grain of truth to them such as the story about flesh eating plants, which he had seen in a television show about nature. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the narrator wonders whether any of the things that she ever said were actually true. This continues up until the strange substitute actually returns to their class, and leaves after she predicted that one of the students would soon meet his end. The events at the end of this story demonstrate the character of both the narrator and of the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi.
The setting in the story Gryphon takes place entirely in a fictional small town called Five Oaks in Michigan. The narrator explains that the town is small enough that nearly everyone in the town knows each other, and that newcomers usually stand out amongst everyone else. This is why when the narrators teacher comes down with a cold, he also mentions that a substitute is hard to come by on such short notice in a small town. A substitute is found for the next day of class, and it is a new female substitute. The students recognize that she is new to town, despite only being in the fourth grade. The substitute explains that she is new in town as well, and that she is of Hungarian and French descent. The impact that the setting has upon the narrator and everyone else in the classroom is that since they live in rural place with a small population, residents that are new are usually very few and far between. This demonstrates that the diversity that is present throughout the entire United States reaches every corner of the country and in every state, county, and city. The effect that this has is shown with the presence of the substitute in the town of Five Oaks.
In conclusion, throughout the short story Gryphon, the main characters progress the ideas and thoughts of other characters that are developed in regards to the substitute, who is also one of the main characters in the story. The plot of the story mainly circles around the narrator that describes the strange substitute, Ms. Ferenczi, being his teacher for several days, and eventually leaving and not coming back after she tells a student that his death was in the immediate future. The characters in the story, which consists of two main characters, which are the narrator and the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi. Both the narrator and the substitute develop over the course of the story in regards to their personalities, interactions with others, and other personal traits as well. The setting throughout the story remains consistently in the same town of Five Oaks in Michigan. Despites this, the setting has a noticeable impact on the emotions that the narrator, students, and other teachers in the story because of the substitutes background, which is something that is unusual and uncommon to the people of the small town. The reason being that everyone in the town knows each other, and having a new resident that is as strange as Ms. Ferenczi is odd even for the children in the fourth-grade class that she is substituting for. These are some of the characteristics from the short story Gryphon in regards to characters, plot, and setting.
PAPER 3 A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have.
Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7

 

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Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the.

Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the writer made you want to learn more? Why or why not?Body:
Underline the topic sentences on the paper. Is there a clear connection between each of the paragraphs and the thesis? If not, where do you see problems?Are points substantiated with evidence? Is the evidence pertinent, reliable, and/or verifiable?Are paragraphs unified (exploring only one idea)? Point out paragraphs that lack unity.Are paragraphs developed (is there enough information in each paragraph)? Point out paragraphs that lack development.Are there in-text citations in MLA style if sources are used?Conclusion:
Is the thesis restated (and, if possible, reworded)? Is the length of the conclusion appropriate? Does it need to be tightened or expanded? Why?What strategies does the paper use to close the discussion (ex: brief summary of points, recommendation)?Are you interested in learning more about (has the author made the topic relevant to you)? Why or why not?Overall Recommendations:
Are there issues related to grammar and punctuation that the author needs to address? If so, what are they?Have sources been quoted correctly, if sources were used?Is the Works Cited formatted correctly, if sources were used?List three strengths (what you feel the author did well) and three weakness (areas that need improvement) of the paper.
PAPER 1
A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have. Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7780.
Batsching, Sophie, et al. Inescapable Stress Changes Walking Behavior in Flies – Learned
Helplessness Revisited. Scholarly Journals, vol. 11, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 116.
PAPER 2 Short Story Essay In the short story Gryphon by Charles Baxter, the author writes a short story from the perspective of a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School in Five Oaks, Michigan. Throughout the course of this story the narrator, who is a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School, talks about the experience of a normal day in his classroom and the interactions that he has with other students and his teacher as well. The story begins in the narrators classroom, and its where the majority of the story takes place. During a normal day of class, the narrators teacher, whose name is Mr. Hibler, begins to feel ill, and starts to cough. This prompts a substitute to be called in to instruct the narrators class in his absence the next day. The setting in the town where the school is located contributes to many of the things that happen in the story, including one of the most notable and important factors of the story, which is the appearance of a substitute teacher called in to teach the narrators class. The substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the entire class, and she leaves a strange initial impression on the class of fourth graders with her eccentric clothing and overall character. Ms. Ferenczi is a woman whose parents are Hungarian and French, and she came to the U.S. because of unknown circumstances. The main characters that are introduced in the beginning of the story play crucial roles to the development of the plot to the story, as well as the progression of the ideas of other characters in regards to how they view the strange new substitute that is taking the place of their normal teacher.
Throughout the length of Gryphon, the story is told through the viewpoint of a fourth-grade student at an elementary school in Michigan, where he is in the process of learning more about Egyptian culture and technology. During one class, his teacher becomes sick with a cold, and he is forced to take a few days off, giving way to a substitute; someone who is difficult to come across in the small community that the narrator lives. The next day, a new strange substitute arrives as cover for the narrators sick teacher. The plot of the story is advanced with every day the substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, spent teaching the students in the narrators class. Ms. Ferenczi would tell the children stories such as why the Egyptians built the pyramids, and also about how death isnt the end of life and everything itself, but the beginning of another existence for human existence. The narrator in this portion of the story is an observer that offers his thoughts on the things that the strange Ms. Ferenczi would say in class. For the most part, the narrator believes that many of the things that Ms. Ferenczi says are not true, and makes a point of this by jokingly convincing one of his classmates on the bus ride home that a lot of the things Ms. Ferenczi says are true. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the other students that are in the narrators class tell their teacher Mr. Hibler about all of the things that Ms. Ferenczi told them about during his absence, but he is indifferent, as most of the work that the students had to complete had been finished. Later on, Ms. Ferenczi returns as a substitute for Mr. Hiblers class, and she is as odd and eccentric as she was before. On this occasion, however, she has a surprise for the students of Mr. Hiblers class, and it is in the form of her telling each of the children their fortunes for the future. Each of the students in the class line up to have Ms. Ferenczi tell their fortune, and some of them are either pleased or frightened by what they are told. In particular, one of the children was told by the substitute that they would soon die, and this made him upset enough to report her to the principal, effectively getting rid of Ms. Ferenczi as their teacher. This demonstrates that the main basis for the plot in the story was a new substitute covering for the narrators sick teacher for a couple of days, and eventually figuring out that the substitute was a very strange women that would have to leave as a result of this.
In the story Gryphon, each one of the main characters in the progress themselves based upon their actions. The narrator is introduced at the start of the story as a normal fourth-grade boy that is simply going through another ordinary day of school. These general characteristics are maintained through the entire story, but eventually, the narrator starts to change how he views things around him and starts to question things that he views as normal occurrences. These changes are in response to others around him, and the largest influencer of these changes is the new substitute that covers the narrators normal teacher, Mr. Hibler. The new substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the class of fourth-graders that the narrator is in. Ms. Ferenczi is dress in clothes with vibrant colors and she wears gaudy, gold rimmed glasses. She is an older woman that has some lines running down her face that the narrator says are similar to Pinocchio. During the beginning of the story, the narrator says that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent and behaves in a flamboyant manner. The reason that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent is because her parents were from Hungary and France, and they came to the U.S. for unknown reasons, according to her. Through the rest of the story, Ms. Ferenczi teaches the students based off of the lesson plan that Mr. Hibler had left for the substitute that covered for him. Despite this, Ms. Ferenczi begins to drift away from the lesson plan, and tells the students stories about things that are slightly related to what they were discussing in class. Ms. Ferenczi told the children about Egyptian myths and she even claimed that she had seen even seen a mythical creature called a Gryphon, which is a hybrid between an eagle and a lion. This caught the interest of all the students in the classroom, including the narrator of the story. They all wondered about all the marvelous stories that Ms. Ferenczi had told them during the time that she was there substitute. The narrator also questioned how legitimate all of the claims that his substitute had made, showing that he had become inquisitive during the time that Ms. Ferenczi had been his substitute. He also knew that some of the things that she had said had a grain of truth to them such as the story about flesh eating plants, which he had seen in a television show about nature. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the narrator wonders whether any of the things that she ever said were actually true. This continues up until the strange substitute actually returns to their class, and leaves after she predicted that one of the students would soon meet his end. The events at the end of this story demonstrate the character of both the narrator and of the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi.
The setting in the story Gryphon takes place entirely in a fictional small town called Five Oaks in Michigan. The narrator explains that the town is small enough that nearly everyone in the town knows each other, and that newcomers usually stand out amongst everyone else. This is why when the narrators teacher comes down with a cold, he also mentions that a substitute is hard to come by on such short notice in a small town. A substitute is found for the next day of class, and it is a new female substitute. The students recognize that she is new to town, despite only being in the fourth grade. The substitute explains that she is new in town as well, and that she is of Hungarian and French descent. The impact that the setting has upon the narrator and everyone else in the classroom is that since they live in rural place with a small population, residents that are new are usually very few and far between. This demonstrates that the diversity that is present throughout the entire United States reaches every corner of the country and in every state, county, and city. The effect that this has is shown with the presence of the substitute in the town of Five Oaks.
In conclusion, throughout the short story Gryphon, the main characters progress the ideas and thoughts of other characters that are developed in regards to the substitute, who is also one of the main characters in the story. The plot of the story mainly circles around the narrator that describes the strange substitute, Ms. Ferenczi, being his teacher for several days, and eventually leaving and not coming back after she tells a student that his death was in the immediate future. The characters in the story, which consists of two main characters, which are the narrator and the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi. Both the narrator and the substitute develop over the course of the story in regards to their personalities, interactions with others, and other personal traits as well. The setting throughout the story remains consistently in the same town of Five Oaks in Michigan. Despites this, the setting has a noticeable impact on the emotions that the narrator, students, and other teachers in the story because of the substitutes background, which is something that is unusual and uncommon to the people of the small town. The reason being that everyone in the town knows each other, and having a new resident that is as strange as Ms. Ferenczi is odd even for the children in the fourth-grade class that she is substituting for. These are some of the characteristics from the short story Gryphon in regards to characters, plot, and setting.
PAPER 3 A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have.
Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7

 

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Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the.

Does the introduction announce the layout of the rest of the paper? What lets you know this?Has the writer made you want to learn more? Why or why not?Body:
Underline the topic sentences on the paper. Is there a clear connection between each of the paragraphs and the thesis? If not, where do you see problems?Are points substantiated with evidence? Is the evidence pertinent, reliable, and/or verifiable?Are paragraphs unified (exploring only one idea)? Point out paragraphs that lack unity.Are paragraphs developed (is there enough information in each paragraph)? Point out paragraphs that lack development.Are there in-text citations in MLA style if sources are used?Conclusion:
Is the thesis restated (and, if possible, reworded)? Is the length of the conclusion appropriate? Does it need to be tightened or expanded? Why?What strategies does the paper use to close the discussion (ex: brief summary of points, recommendation)?Are you interested in learning more about (has the author made the topic relevant to you)? Why or why not?Overall Recommendations:
Are there issues related to grammar and punctuation that the author needs to address? If so, what are they?Have sources been quoted correctly, if sources were used?Is the Works Cited formatted correctly, if sources were used?List three strengths (what you feel the author did well) and three weakness (areas that need improvement) of the paper.
PAPER 1
A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have. Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7780.
Batsching, Sophie, et al. Inescapable Stress Changes Walking Behavior in Flies – Learned
Helplessness Revisited. Scholarly Journals, vol. 11, no. 11, Nov. 2016, pp. 116.
PAPER 2 Short Story Essay In the short story Gryphon by Charles Baxter, the author writes a short story from the perspective of a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School in Five Oaks, Michigan. Throughout the course of this story the narrator, who is a fourth-grade student at Garfield-Murray Elementary School, talks about the experience of a normal day in his classroom and the interactions that he has with other students and his teacher as well. The story begins in the narrators classroom, and its where the majority of the story takes place. During a normal day of class, the narrators teacher, whose name is Mr. Hibler, begins to feel ill, and starts to cough. This prompts a substitute to be called in to instruct the narrators class in his absence the next day. The setting in the town where the school is located contributes to many of the things that happen in the story, including one of the most notable and important factors of the story, which is the appearance of a substitute teacher called in to teach the narrators class. The substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the entire class, and she leaves a strange initial impression on the class of fourth graders with her eccentric clothing and overall character. Ms. Ferenczi is a woman whose parents are Hungarian and French, and she came to the U.S. because of unknown circumstances. The main characters that are introduced in the beginning of the story play crucial roles to the development of the plot to the story, as well as the progression of the ideas of other characters in regards to how they view the strange new substitute that is taking the place of their normal teacher.
Throughout the length of Gryphon, the story is told through the viewpoint of a fourth-grade student at an elementary school in Michigan, where he is in the process of learning more about Egyptian culture and technology. During one class, his teacher becomes sick with a cold, and he is forced to take a few days off, giving way to a substitute; someone who is difficult to come across in the small community that the narrator lives. The next day, a new strange substitute arrives as cover for the narrators sick teacher. The plot of the story is advanced with every day the substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, spent teaching the students in the narrators class. Ms. Ferenczi would tell the children stories such as why the Egyptians built the pyramids, and also about how death isnt the end of life and everything itself, but the beginning of another existence for human existence. The narrator in this portion of the story is an observer that offers his thoughts on the things that the strange Ms. Ferenczi would say in class. For the most part, the narrator believes that many of the things that Ms. Ferenczi says are not true, and makes a point of this by jokingly convincing one of his classmates on the bus ride home that a lot of the things Ms. Ferenczi says are true. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the other students that are in the narrators class tell their teacher Mr. Hibler about all of the things that Ms. Ferenczi told them about during his absence, but he is indifferent, as most of the work that the students had to complete had been finished. Later on, Ms. Ferenczi returns as a substitute for Mr. Hiblers class, and she is as odd and eccentric as she was before. On this occasion, however, she has a surprise for the students of Mr. Hiblers class, and it is in the form of her telling each of the children their fortunes for the future. Each of the students in the class line up to have Ms. Ferenczi tell their fortune, and some of them are either pleased or frightened by what they are told. In particular, one of the children was told by the substitute that they would soon die, and this made him upset enough to report her to the principal, effectively getting rid of Ms. Ferenczi as their teacher. This demonstrates that the main basis for the plot in the story was a new substitute covering for the narrators sick teacher for a couple of days, and eventually figuring out that the substitute was a very strange women that would have to leave as a result of this.
In the story Gryphon, each one of the main characters in the progress themselves based upon their actions. The narrator is introduced at the start of the story as a normal fourth-grade boy that is simply going through another ordinary day of school. These general characteristics are maintained through the entire story, but eventually, the narrator starts to change how he views things around him and starts to question things that he views as normal occurrences. These changes are in response to others around him, and the largest influencer of these changes is the new substitute that covers the narrators normal teacher, Mr. Hibler. The new substitute, whose name is Ms. Ferenczi, introduces herself to the class of fourth-graders that the narrator is in. Ms. Ferenczi is dress in clothes with vibrant colors and she wears gaudy, gold rimmed glasses. She is an older woman that has some lines running down her face that the narrator says are similar to Pinocchio. During the beginning of the story, the narrator says that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent and behaves in a flamboyant manner. The reason that Ms. Ferenczi speaks with a strange accent is because her parents were from Hungary and France, and they came to the U.S. for unknown reasons, according to her. Through the rest of the story, Ms. Ferenczi teaches the students based off of the lesson plan that Mr. Hibler had left for the substitute that covered for him. Despite this, Ms. Ferenczi begins to drift away from the lesson plan, and tells the students stories about things that are slightly related to what they were discussing in class. Ms. Ferenczi told the children about Egyptian myths and she even claimed that she had seen even seen a mythical creature called a Gryphon, which is a hybrid between an eagle and a lion. This caught the interest of all the students in the classroom, including the narrator of the story. They all wondered about all the marvelous stories that Ms. Ferenczi had told them during the time that she was there substitute. The narrator also questioned how legitimate all of the claims that his substitute had made, showing that he had become inquisitive during the time that Ms. Ferenczi had been his substitute. He also knew that some of the things that she had said had a grain of truth to them such as the story about flesh eating plants, which he had seen in a television show about nature. After Ms. Ferenczi leaves, the narrator wonders whether any of the things that she ever said were actually true. This continues up until the strange substitute actually returns to their class, and leaves after she predicted that one of the students would soon meet his end. The events at the end of this story demonstrate the character of both the narrator and of the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi.
The setting in the story Gryphon takes place entirely in a fictional small town called Five Oaks in Michigan. The narrator explains that the town is small enough that nearly everyone in the town knows each other, and that newcomers usually stand out amongst everyone else. This is why when the narrators teacher comes down with a cold, he also mentions that a substitute is hard to come by on such short notice in a small town. A substitute is found for the next day of class, and it is a new female substitute. The students recognize that she is new to town, despite only being in the fourth grade. The substitute explains that she is new in town as well, and that she is of Hungarian and French descent. The impact that the setting has upon the narrator and everyone else in the classroom is that since they live in rural place with a small population, residents that are new are usually very few and far between. This demonstrates that the diversity that is present throughout the entire United States reaches every corner of the country and in every state, county, and city. The effect that this has is shown with the presence of the substitute in the town of Five Oaks.
In conclusion, throughout the short story Gryphon, the main characters progress the ideas and thoughts of other characters that are developed in regards to the substitute, who is also one of the main characters in the story. The plot of the story mainly circles around the narrator that describes the strange substitute, Ms. Ferenczi, being his teacher for several days, and eventually leaving and not coming back after she tells a student that his death was in the immediate future. The characters in the story, which consists of two main characters, which are the narrator and the substitute, Ms. Ferenczi. Both the narrator and the substitute develop over the course of the story in regards to their personalities, interactions with others, and other personal traits as well. The setting throughout the story remains consistently in the same town of Five Oaks in Michigan. Despites this, the setting has a noticeable impact on the emotions that the narrator, students, and other teachers in the story because of the substitutes background, which is something that is unusual and uncommon to the people of the small town. The reason being that everyone in the town knows each other, and having a new resident that is as strange as Ms. Ferenczi is odd even for the children in the fourth-grade class that she is substituting for. These are some of the characteristics from the short story Gryphon in regards to characters, plot, and setting.
PAPER 3 A Bittersweet Hour
The Story of an Hour, written by Kate Chopin displays a common struggle that most women internally encountered during the eighteen-hundreds. There were very few rights that women had during this time period. Chopin often writes based off the feelings of women who are not happy with their love life. As mentioned in the cultural context, Chopin was married in a state where the men were favored both legally and physically. Women were powerless compared to their male counterparts. Due to the lack of respect and authority, married women were imprisoned in marriages. Their body and possessions belonged to their husband. Divorce was uncommon, so everything was done to remain as happy as possible. Even if that means ignoring the dark, negative thoughts that come to mind. Women fall into a pattern of learned helplessness. This means that no matter what intervention is utilized, the same outcome will occur. Therefore, trying to prevent something becomes useless. The term learned helplessness is used to refer to any behavioral or physiological consequence of exposure to an adverse event that is produced not by the event itself but by the organisms lack of behavioral control over the event (Batsching et al. 1). There is no surprise, given the time of events, that Louis Mallard reacted the way she did. Freedom was a new element of her life that she was not used to. Although the story only describes one hour into a womans life, the audience experiences the feelings of what thousands of women during this time period were dealing with.
The plot of the story is linear, narrated in the third person omniscient point of view. This gives the audience the advantage of knowing about the train wreck before Mrs. Mallard is aware and the immediate actions after her death. This also allows the audience to understand Mrs. Mallards actions more. If the story were to be told in first person, Mrs. Mallard may come across as a selfish, spoiled wife. The layout is displayed in chronological order. The storys exposition begins by informing the audience about Mrs. Mallards heart condition. Although, the condition is not named specifically, it is understood that heart breaking news must be delivered to her in a delicate manner. Josephine, Mrs. Mallards sister, is the one in charge of presenting the terrible news. Richards, Mr. Millards friend, was the one who had first discovered the news, but as also there for support.
The main conflict in the story is that a train crash killed Mr. Mallard. It is the job of Richards and Josephine to strategically break the news to the new widow. A difficult task considering that the news can affect her beloved sister physically. Josephine internally fears that the knowledge of her husband passing could kill Mrs. Mallard. As skillfully as possible, given the circumstances, Josephine relays the tragic news to her sister. Grief overcomes Mrs. Mallard immediately as she begins to cry. However, she soon excuses herself to go upstairs alone to ponder the situation. This is where to real climax is reach. Mrs. Mallard is overwhelmed with a growing feeling deep side that is overcoming her. After coming to an abrupt realization, she says, Free, free, free! A reaction the audience was not expecting. The realization that her personal freedom is redeemed is too much for her to stand. The deep feeling that would come across as depression, ends up being utter excitement.
Her pulse beats fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. This line is foreshadowing her death. An excessive amount of happiness is just as capable of effecting her heart condition as an anxiety attack. Her mind is racing with what is yet to be. A future full of bliss would energize to most dull person. Her reaction to this is completely understandable. She is coming from a marriage she was forced to forever endure. Her feelings are justified when she explains that she will weep about the passing, but the future is so bright that the focus is elsewhere.
A symbol is shown as Mrs. Mallard confesses, internally, her intermitted love for her husband by saying:
And yet she loved him- sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being
This symbolizes the distorted way people viewed love in the eight-teen hundreds. Mrs. Mallard confesses that she did not understand the love she had for her husband. That is because it was not love. It was misconstrued with enjoying the presence of another individual, or that absence of loneness. Mrs. Mallards life was not hers to rule, and the idea of a companion kept her sane.
This misunderstanding can still be recognized in todays society in emotionally abusive relationships. Over time, emotional abuse can be as powerful a control tactic as physical abuse (Reed and Enright 805). Women are viewed as something that needs to be constantly under control.
The tone in the beginning of the story is stressful with hints of sadness, transforms to a radiant happiness and closes as ironic. As the story is introduce, the readers are aware of a terrible tragedy. To tell a wife her husband has passed should be a stressful situation. Once the news is delivered grief follows along promptly. After much thinking our main character realizes her newfound freedom. That is when her happiness becomes infectious. It is short live as the irony hits. After praying to live a long life after hearing the news, she passes away. The situational irony does not end there either, because her husband never did die in the crash. This irony is similar to the way women views their lives. Women want to be free so much, but freedom is always out of their grasp. Never truly getting to taste the sweet victory we call freedom.
Figures of speech are implemented in this brief story. Personification is mention when the narrator says, Into this she sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul. Physical exhaustion obviously cannot physically actually haunt her or reach into her soul, but it amplifies the intensity of the feeling she is experiencing. Personification is also mentioned later on Mrs. Mallards fancy is running wild due to the thoughts she was having. The narrator uses a metaphor to describe to amount of joy Mrs. Mallard is in by saying, No; she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window. These figures of speech help explain the extent to which the characters are feeling, but the imagery does that as well. Throughout the story, the narrator describes things in fine detail. From Mrs. Mallards face to the life shown outside the window. That piece of detail appeals to the audiences sense of sight. Giving the readers the opportunity to visualize what Mrs. Mallard may look like and what she is seeing outside the second story window.
Louis Mallard is our main character and protagonist. She is closely observed, described and followed throughout this piece of literature. She is a round, dynamic character because of the way she develops throughout the story. Initially she is viewed by the audience for being the stereotypical wife that is about to get news that will paralyze her mentally for the rest of her life. Besides the brief grief she displays, she surprises us with her abundance of happiness. The audience picks up on the critical thinking that she goes through to realize this sense of happiness. In a way, it builds the readers respect for this woman for being so strong. The readers perspective of Mrs. Mallard changes from our trademark version of a wife in the eight-teen hundreds to a liberated woman who finally gets a taste of freedom. Josephine is a flat, static character because she remains the same throughout the context. She is only worried about the well-being of her sister and will remain as part of her support system. Richards is another flat, static character. He is the individual who recognized Brently Mallards name on the list of people killed from the wreck. Potentially, he is to blame for Mrs. Mallards death. It is in the end that we figured out Mr. Mallard was not killed. The odds that someone had the same name as Brently Mallard are slim, yet, they add a dramatic twist. Brently Mallard, only mentioned at the end of the story, is a supporting character. Nothing is known about his character besides that he has a wife. Once the news got out that she died of joy, his reaction is would be unknown for the reader. That is because we have not been able to observe Mr. Mallard at all.
Many themes can be taken away from this short story, but freedom from oppression is the one that stands out the most. Anyone educated on the eight-teen hundreds understands that women were viewed as incompetent. When married, everything that a woman is, becomes her husbands. Womens rights were not even a thing to people back then. A womens job was to cook, clean and to give her husband whatever he wants. Even if it meant their body. Women were stuck in this culture where men were these superior figures who owned them. With little that was able to be done or said, women felt hopeless. Forget about divorce, because that was not positively looked at during that time frame either. Most women would find themselves feeling as Mrs. Mallard did if they were to lose their significant other. How is it possible that all these members of society who come to realize this unequal division of power usually follow and accept the rules of the dominant people (Nociar 78). Society ushers people to act a certain way, so women tended to not go against the grain with this issue. Women would rather sugar coat their lives than to be shunned or viewed terribly. With that being said, Mrs. Mallards reaction was not so surprising. However, to the viewer will interpret her actions based off of the stereotypical responses. To be a woman who can live for herself was something of a dream. Although that may be our reality today, those women did not have that luxury. These ideas will make female readers will reflect and appreciate the luxuries that they have.
Works Cited
Reed, Gayle L., and Robert D. Enright. The Effects of Forgiveness Therapy on Depression,
Anxiety, and Posttraumatic Stress For Women After Spousal Emotional Abuse. Journal
of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 74, no. 5, Oct. 2006, pp. 920929.Nociar, Tomas. Glasberg, Davita Silfen – Shannon, Deric: Political Sociology: Opression,
Resistance and the State. Slovensk Politologick Revue, vol. 12, no. 1, 2012, pp. 7

 

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Answer the questions based on the reading documents.

 

Answer these questions based on the reading documents which I uploaded to additional materials.

 

Assignment Questions:

1. Why do you think Columbus planted the flag of Spain immediately when he landed? What was this intended to symbolize? How did the Spanish exploration of Columbus contrast with the Chinese exploration of Zheng He?

2. Do you think that Columbus felt that Spanish civilization was superior to the native civilization that he encountered on the island? What features do you think Columbus thought ‘civilization’ had? (You should list at least 3 distinct aspects of what Columbus thought ‘civilization’ to be).

3. What resources did Columbus describe on these islands? Why was that important? How did Spain intend to exploit this discovery?

 

I also added the questions with the documents

if you need any other information please email me.

 

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Renaissance Sculptor Donatello

  • 2 page biography of the Artist (Donatello)
  • 2 page description, formal analysis, and interpretation of Saint George
  • 2 page description, formal analysis, and interpretation of The Feast of Herod
  • In conclusion, tell why you picked this artist.

Total of 6 pages.

 

 

 

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Create a personal blog

PERSONAL BLOG / PHOTO ESSAY INFORMATION

The deadline to upload your Personal Blog address only is 3 weeks after you have started at your internship..  Go to Assignments to see Personal Blog UPLOAD.

 

During your internship, it is essential to maintain a personal blog of your experience, accomplishments and learning to share with family, friends and/or future employers. The use of a photo essay/blog journal should enable you to pause, reflect, understand and share the learning, changes and growth you have experienced while working in the industry.

 

A permanent option is to create your own blog using Tumblr, Weebly, Wixs etc.                      You must give this link/blog address to your professor in order for them to access and view your photo essay/blog.  This photo essay/blog will NOT disappear but can be used as an online e-portfolio of your career documents, work experiences etc. during a future interview.

You must post one photo essay/blog by each Sunday for 9 weeks. Each student will have a different start week so as long as you have 9 entries = 10%.  Ensure you share and encourage classmates and visitors to your photo essay/blog.  Get feedback from them.

Steps to Creating your own blog platform

1.         Choose a platform of your choice.

Wix, Tumblr, Weebly, Google or any other blog platform you are comfortable with

2.         Open your Web Page/Blog and personalize reflecting your personal values

Organize your site, be creative most importantly be professional!!

3.         Post a minimum of one reflection/accomplishment on a weekly basis by Sunday.

Posts may include scripted content, labelled photos and short videos, youtube reflections.

4.         Optional…..Get you own Domain.com and send your faculty, family and friends invitations to view.

What do I post and write about?

Your work, travel, relationships and significant global experiences! Highlight workplace experiences/challenges and activities. Reflections may include new workplace colleagues, work experiences, new industry seminars/trade shows you have experienced. Upload high resolution photos, imbed tags and most importantly encourage others to comment on your posts.

As time goes by, you will find that the blog will become repetitive. This is when you should change your writings from what you are doing to a more contemplative approach and where your future may take you. This is when the blog truly becomes reflective. Your photo essay/blog is a good place to reflect on your experiences with co-workers and supervisors. Truly this should be a highlight or summary of your weekly experiences.

 

PLEASE NOTE: All posts must be professional in corporate proper grammar and spelling and not be alarming to the viewer. Internet etiquette must apply.

Internet Etiquette:  Please ask and get permission from any people who appear in your photos other than yourself.  Be aware that photos taken in a workplace, airport, train station etc MAY be prohibited according to company policy.  Get permission FIRST. 

Do NOT post any confidential business information online nor unprofessional ranting about colleagues.  Even if you have set up your privacy settings…information has a way of getting out. 

Never burn your bridges……

 

** Some additional information’s for this Blog are given below:

 

  1. Create a Personal Blog and send me the link
  2.  I am doing my internship in a Travel agency which name is White Horse Travel Ltd.
  3.  I receive customer`s phone calls and try to give them all the information whatever they want like Air cost, Flight details etc.
  4. I am trying to learn how to book airline the tickets.
  5. If you need any other information please email me

 

 

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Buil a 5 days Itenerary and do the costing based on the iinerary

 

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Reflection Paper ( Independent by Flight Centre)

Flight Centre Guest Speaker Reflection Paper

1000-1500 Reflection Paper on what you have learned about Flight Centre and what they have to offer

 

Some important notes taken from the class when the Guests spoken are given below:

               

Ø Guests Name:- 1) Remi  2) Heather

Ø 2035- Major Global Force FX, Fitness, Travel

Ø Mission Statement- To open up the world for those who want to see

Ø Every 30 days around 50 thousand flights get cancelled everyday

Ø Ash tag book with a human- search

Ø 21 years of experience- Heather

Ø FCBT-booking on more business client – small groups

Ø Corporate travel- like FBCT but more on a bigger account ex- Bell –Roger-100-200 flights hotels per week.

Ø Stage and screen – movie production – TV production- Stars/Directors/Artist

Ø CI Events- Corporate Incentive Events – Like a Conference down in to s different place

Ø Independent Flight Centre- part of the leisure

Ø Laurier Du Vallon- Luxury Brand- Island Trips/ Choppers/ Concierge- Customized unique travel- tailored specially as how the client wants –Very High End- Room upgrades

Ø Flight Centre Holidays–

Ø Group interview- Two way to see if it’s a right fit – Dress smart and casual- family worth 40 brands- take notes-ask questions- activities- written assignment- simulate as a travel consultant- how you handle complex situations, and how have you handled-

Ø Dream big- work hard- stay focused- surround yourself with good people

 

 

For more information please visit here: https://www.transplo.com/CA/Toronto/171252156237489/Independent-By-Flight-Centre

 

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